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THREE CORE CONCEPTS IN EARLY DEVELOPMENT

3. Toxic Stress Derails Healthy Development


Learning how to cope with adversity is an important part of healthy development. While moderate, short-lived stress responses in the body can promote growth, toxic stress is the strong, unrelieved activation of the body’s stress management system in the absence of protective adult support. Without caring adults to buffer children, the unrelenting stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, or severe maternal depression can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning, behavior, and both physical and mental health.

This video is part three of a three-part series titled "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics now give us a much better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains, for better or for worse. Healthy development in the early years provides the building blocks for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, lifelong health, strong communities, and successful parenting of the next generation. 

Also from the "Three Core Concepts in Early Development" Series

For more information, related resources, and answers to frequently asked questions about toxic stress:

 





Major support for this video series has been provided by: the Birth to Five Policy Alliance, the Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and the First Five Years Fund. 

 

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