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InBrief Series


The InBrief series provides brief summaries of recent scientific presentations and research on the science of early childhood development and early childhood program evaluation. These one-sheet briefs, designed to be printed on one page, front and back, are also available as a companion video series.

 


 

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InBrief: The Science of ECD video

InBrief: The Science of Early Childhood Development

This edition of the InBrief series addresses basic concepts of early childhood development, established over decades of neuroscience and behavioral research, which help illustrate why child development—particularly from birth to five years—is a foundation for a prosperous and sustainable society.

The PDF format of this brief was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.
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View video version of this InBrief >>

View video en Español >>

 

 

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InBrief: The Impact of Early Adversity on Children's Development

InBrief: The Impact of Early Adversity on Children's Development

This brief outlines basic concepts from the research on the biology of stress which show that major adversity can weaken developing brain architecture and permanently set the body's stress response system on high alert. Science also shows that providing stable, responsive environments for children in the earliest years of life can prevent or reverse these conditions, with lifelong consequences for learning, behavior, and health.

The PDF format of this brief was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

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View video version of this InBrief >>

View video en Español >>

 

 

InBrief: Early Childhood Program Effectiveness

InBrief: Early Childhood Program Effectiveness

InBrief: Early Childhood Program Effectiveness

This edition of the InBrief series outlines basic concepts from four decades of program evaluation research which help explain how society can ensure that children have a solid foundation for a productive future by creating and implementing effective early childhood programs and policies.


The PDF format of this brief was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

Download PDF >>

View video version of this InBrief >>

 

 

 

 

InBrief: The Foundations of Lifelong Health

InBrief: The Foundations of Lifelong Health video

InBrief: The Foundations of Lifelong Health

This edition of the InBrief series explains why a vital and productive society with a prosperous and sustainable future is built on a foundation of healthy child development. The brief summarizes findings from The Foundations of Lifelong Health Are Built in Early Childhood, a report co-authored by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs.

The PDF format of this brief was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

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View video version of this brief >>

View video en Español >>

 

 

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InBrief: Executive Function

InBrief: Executive Function: Essential Skills for Life and Learning

Being able to focus, hold and work with information in mind, filter distractions, and switch gears is like having a sophisticated air traffic control system to manage information at a busy airport. In the brain, this mechanism is called executive function and self-regulation, a group of skills that, with the right formative experiences, begin to develop in early childhood and continue to improve through the early adult years. A new evidence base has identified these skills as essential for school achievement, success in work, and healthy lives. This two-page summary outlines how these lifelong skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life.

The PDF format of this brief was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

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View video version of this brief >>

 

 

 

 

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InBrief: Early Childhood Mental Health

The science of child development shows that the foundation for sound mental health is built early in life, as early experiences—which include children’s relationships with parents, caregivers, relatives, teachers, and peers—shape the architecture of the developing brain. Disruptions in this developmental process can impair a child’s capacities for learning and relating to others, with lifelong implications. This two-page summary—part of the InBrief series—explains why, many costly problems for society, ranging from the failure to complete high school to incarceration to homelessness, could be dramatically reduced if attention were paid to improving children’s environments of relationships and experiences early in life. The brief provides an overview of Establishing a Level Foundation for Life: Mental Health Begins in Early Childhood, a Working Paper by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.

This PDF was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

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InBrief: The Science of Neglect

Thriving communities depend on the successful development of the people who live in them, and building the foundations of successful development in childhood requires responsive relationships and supportive environments. Beginning shortly after birth, the typical “serve and return” interactions that occur between young children and the adults who care for them actually affect the formation of neural connections and the circuitry of the developing brain. This two-page summary—part of the InBrief series—explains why when adult responses are unreliable, inappropriate, or simply absent, developing brain circuits can be disrupted, and subsequent learning, behavior, and health can be impaired. The brief provides an overview of The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain, a Working Paper by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.

This PDF was designed to be printed on one page, front and back.

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 View the video format of this brief >>