Key Concepts: Brain Architecture

Experiences Build Brain Architecture

Early experiences affect the development of brain architecture, which provides the foundation for all future learning, behavior, and health. Just as a weak foundation compromises the quality and strength of a house, adverse experiences early in life can impair brain architecture, with negative effects lasting into adulthood.


Brains are built over time, from the bottom up.
The basic architecture of the brain is constructed through an ongoing process that begins before birth and continues into adulthood. Simpler neural connections and skills form first, followed by more complex circuits and skills. In the first few years of life, 700 to 1,000 new neural connections form every second. After this period of rapid proliferation, connections are reduced through a process called pruning, which allows brain circuits to become more efficient.


The interactions of genes and experience shape the developing brain. 
Although genes provide the blueprint for the formation of brain circuits, these circuits are reinforced by repeated use. A major ingredient in this developmental process is the serve and return interaction between children and their parents and other caregivers in the family or community. In the absence of responsive caregiving—or if responses are unreliable or inappropriate—the brain’s architecture does not form as expected, which can lead to disparities in learning and behavior. Ultimately, genes and experiences work together to construct brain architecture.

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Never Too Late, But Earlier Is Better

The first years of life are a very busy and crucial time for the development of brain circuits. The brain has the most plasticity, or capacity for change, during this time, which means it is a period of both great opportunity and vulnerability. The impact of experiences on brain development is greatest during these years—for better or for worse. It is easier and less costly to form strong brain circuits during the early years than it is to intervene or "fix" them later. Brains never stop developing—it is never too late to build new neural circuits—but in establishing a strong foundation for brain architecture, earlier is better.

Graph Source: Pat Levitt (2009). For complete reference information, please see the version of this graph that appears in the interactive feature "Core Concepts in the Science of Early Childhood Development."


C
ognitive, emotional, and social capacities are inextricably intertwined throughout the life course.
The brain is a highly integrated organ and its multiple functions operate in coordination with one another. Emotional well-being and social competence provide a strong foundation for emerging cognitive abilities, and together they are the bricks and mortar of brain architecture. The emotional and physical health, social skills, and cognitive-linguistic capacities that emerge in the early years are all important for success in school, the workplace, and in the larger community.


Toxic stress weakens the architecture of the developing brain, which can lead to lifelong problems in learning, behavior, and physical and mental health. Experiencing stress is an important part of healthy development. Activation of the stress response produces a wide range of physiological reactions that prepare the body to deal with threat. However, when these responses remain activated at high levels for significant periods of time, without supportive relationships to help calm them, toxic stress results. This can impair the development of neural connections, especially in the areas of the brain dedicated to higher-order skills.

 

 









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