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gccfundedbylogo_EN.gifA program of Grand Challenges Canada, Saving Brains seeks to improve outcomes for children living in poverty through interventions that nurture and protect early brain development in the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. The Center on the Developing Child supports a dynamic learning community of Saving Brains grantees to help them advance the impact and scale of their work within global contexts.

The Saving Brains portfolio of activities is designed to develop and broaden the reach of products, services, and policies that protect and nurture early brain development. Its activities work to support the lifelong health of children and provide selected countries with a strategy to help break the cycle of poverty. 

Within the program, the Saving Brains Platform brings together mentors and experts in the fields of early childhood development, innovation systems, and learning communities. Led by the Center on the Developing Child and the TruePoint Center, the Platform works to enhance the collective impact of the Saving Brains program by:

  • Articulating a common theory for action based on scientific knowledge and practical experience;
  • Developing shared metrics and evaluation frameworks for interventions;
  • Fostering an ongoing learning community to accelerate innovation through sharing lessons and results; and
  • Encouraging policy translation through cross-sectional leadership development.

Through sharing results and discussing lessons learned, this community is generating a body of research and practical knowledge on how to develop, refine, and evaluate innovative solutions. Together, the community is also creating a suite of interventions for nurturing and protecting early brain development. Currently, projects are being implemented in low- and middle-income countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America.


 

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