title-wps.jpg

wp9.jpgWorking Paper #9

Persistent Fear and Anxiety Can Affect Young Children’s Learning and Development


Ensuring that young children have safe, secure environments in which to grow, learn, and develop healthy brains and bodies is not only good for the children themselves but also builds a strong foundation for a thriving, prosperous society. Science shows that early exposure to circumstances that produce persistent fear and chronic anxiety can have lifelong consequences by disrupting the developing architecture of the brain. Unfortunately, many young children are exposed to such circumstances. This report from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child summarizes in clear language why, while some of these experiences are one-time events and others may reoccur or persist over time, all of them have the potential to affect how children learn, solve problems, and relate to others. 

Suggested citation: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child (2010). Persistent Fear and Anxiety Can Affect Young Children’s Learning and Development: Working Paper No. 9. Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu


Download PDF >>


Order printed copies >>

 


 


More Working Papers

 

related-resources-760.gif